A Widespread Bântu-Kôngo Song Promoting Community

In the Service of our Ancestors and African Love,
Listen Seeker, I come in peace,

“The only active force that arises out of possession is fear of losing the object of possession.” — African Proverb

Greed only begets Greed. Individualism is Slavery. One who does not aid one’s Sibling today may be unaided by that Sibling tomorrow. Strength is Organized. A single grain of sand harms no one; but a burial in sand can subdue even the strongest men. Culture is how a people survive. In Freedom, our Songs had meaning. The following Bântu-Kôngo song promoted Prosperous, Independent African Communities. The concepts are General to African people and promote the same development that the African Blood Siblings does. Today, our hope for Prosperous, Independent African Communities lie in the African Blood Siblings. Unaided that hope can die. Please Donate and Enlist.

Excerpt from “African Cosmology of the Bântu-Kôngo” on African Collectivism
By Kimbwandende Kia Bunseki Fu-Kiau

For the Bântu, and the Kôngo in particular, it is a crime to own property that is worth more than the standard wealth of ordinary members of the community. Such property could not be obtained by honest means without taking the path of exploiting the community and its members [wuka kimvuka ye bièla biândi]. Here is a widespread aphorism that community members sing (cite) before a meeting that deals with serious social, political, economic or criminal issues within the community (excerpt from Makuku Matutu).

Mu kânda

Within the community

Ka mukadi mputu

There is no room for poverty

Mu kânda

Within the community

Ka Mukadi mvwama

There is no room for ill obtained wealth

Mu kânda

Within the community

Ka mukadi mpofo

There is no room for blindness

Mu kânda

Within the community

Ka mukadi mfumu

There is no room for “order-giver”

Ka mukadi n’nânga

There is no room for slaves

Babo mfumu na mfumu

All are masters, and only masters

Babo ngânga na ngânga

All specialists, and only specialists

Mu kânda

Within the community

Bilesi

Young generations

Mu kânda

Within the community

Mwâna mfumu

Ancestors’ sons

Mu kânda

Within the community

Busi/nsâng’a kânda

A sister, the community shoot

Mu kânda

Within the community

Nkasi a kânda

A brother, the future leader

Mu kânda

Within the community

Kinenga ye dedede

Equilibrium and equality

Mu kânda

Within the community

Kingenga/kimpambudi mwânana

There is no room for separatism/privacy

Mu kânda

Within the community

Sèkila kumosi

All sleep at once

Mu kânda

Within the community

Sikamana kumosi

All wake up at once

Mu kânda

Within the community

Mbèni ku mbazi

Enemies stand out

This very poetic and political aphorism of folk teaching demonstrates how the dialectical philosophy of “primitive” African collectivism is rooted among African societies in general, and among the Bântu in particular. African collectivism practised among the Bântu-Kôngo rejects poverty as well as private ownership of property such as land, industries, means of production, etc. Such properties should only be owned and controlled by the community. The attention in this community is more centered on man as part of a body, the community, [kânda/mumvuka]. As such, that part must obey the community law, and not the contrary of that n’kîngu, principle. The Kôngo concept of wealth and kanda does not mean that the Kôngo reject the practical money value; they, of course, do need money within the community to serve its members, not to oppress them, for they say–When you engender offspring, you must also engender the material goods to secure their life [Wabuta, buta na mbôngo].

4 thoughts on “A Widespread Bântu-Kôngo Song Promoting Community

  1. kaheru

    True ..we need to remove African borders ..at least acknowledge..one military african united family ..also the same unity need s to show in economics and medicine god bless us

    Reply
    1. Onitaset Post author

      Alara (Warrior King),

      “There grows no wheat where there is no grain.” — African Proverb

      In time, perhaps. However, the grain must precede the wheat.

      Reply

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