Top 10 Civil Liberties Violations that Helped Cause the African Revolution in America

Listen Seeker, I come in peace,

You go along to get along
With a song of forgiveness
A strong people would fight wrong
But you go along with it.

Maroon and Build For Self

Comedy, Tragedy, how do they differ?  In differing the European from the African, Cheikh Ante Diop explained how theirs is tragic literature whereas ours is comedic; yet what’s more comedic than a Europeans’ musings?  A European had enumerated the “Top 10 Civil Liberties Violations that Helped Cause the American Revolution” and any informed reader may suspect the author is a comedian.  For if these violations were cause for an American Revolution, Africans ought revolt daily.  But maybe it’s truly tragedy, not comedy, for it’s certainly tragic that, enduring worse, the African revolts less, preferring to “go along to get along” and “go along with it.”  Clearly, it’s no wonder that tragedy defines as an African in European Society.  More Grievances are enumerated here.

Top 10 Civil Liberties Violations that Helped Cause the African Revolution in America
By Onitaset Kumat

(Tom Head for About.com wrote “Top 10 Civil Liberties Violations that Helped Cause the American Revolution.”  I blockquote each of his passages and rewrite them below as pertaining to the African Revolution in America.  In the rewrites, italics symbolize direct differences and bold symbolizes creative additions.  Obviously, most societies of Africans can field the same complaints against Europeans as Europeans have a Nature; like a dog is a dog, a European is a European.  9 Grievances are listed here.)

The Declaration of Independence that was signed on July 4th, 1776 did not represent the culmination of a practical policy decision to separate from Britain. It was a response–an angry, desperate response–to British oppression of North American colonists. Here are ten specific British policies to which the signers of the Declaration of Independence were responding.

The Declaration of Separation that was signed on [Unspecified Date] did not represent the culmination of a practical policy decision to separate from Europeans in America. It was a response–an angry, desperate response to European oppression of African denizens. Here are ten specific European polices to which the signers of the Declaration of Separation were responding.

1. Taxation Without Representation
To fund its military projects, and to assert its control over an increasingly independent group of colonies, Britain began to enforce painfully high taxes and tariffs on such goods as molasses, paper, sugar, and tea. With no representation in Parliament, American colonists who felt the taxes to be excessive had no recourse other than civil disobedience.

1. Taxation Without Representation
To fund its military projects, and to assert its control over an increasingly independent group of Africans, Europeans began to enforce painfully high taxes, limitations and tariffs on such goods as textiles, crude oil, vehicles, parts, cocoa products; such property as homes, businesses, and capital; and such resources as platinum, cobalt, and manganese.  With no representation in Congress, African denizens who felt the taxes to be excessive had no recourse other than civil disobedience.

2. No Free Trade
During the 18th century, Britain was an empire in competition, sometimes militarily and sometimes economically, with other empires. In order to prevent other nations from benefiting from the North American colonial market, Britain brought its navy to bear against U.S. attempts to purchase non-British goods. Given the prohibitively high trade tariffs enforced by Britain (see below), this policy was for all practical purposes unenforceable.

2. No Free Trade
During the 21st century, Europeans in America were in competition, sometimes militarily and sometimes economically, with other people. In order to prevent other people from benefiting from the African in America’s market, Europeans brought its law enforcement to bear against African attempts to purchase non-European goods unless from strategic Asian allies. Given the prohibitively high trade tariffs enforced by Europeans (see below), this policy was for all practical purposes enforced through mental and physical slavery.

3. Unlimited Search and Seizure
To discourage smuggling, the British government awarded Writs of Assistance to British officers in the colonies. The Writs gave officers the power to search any residence or building, without warning or supervision, and to confiscate whatever they deemed to be smuggled or otherwise improperly obtained goods. This widely abused policy would ultimately inspire the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

3. Unlimited Search and Seizure
To discourage smuggling, the Europeans awarded Stop and Frisk Laws to European officers in America. The legislation gave officers the power to search any residence or building, without warning or supervision, and to confiscate whatever they deemed to be smuggled or otherwise improperly obtained goods. This widely abused policy would ultimately trample the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

4. Destruction of Colonial Government
The governments of the colonies, unrepresented in the British system and remote from the imperial legislative process, began to create their own elected bodies. The British government did not care for this idea, and took extra measures to see to it that local elected colonial government did not achieve autonomy, even with respect to matters that did not directly affect the larger British Empire.

4. Destruction of Self-Government
The governments of Africans, unrepresented in the European system and remote from the imperial democratic legislative process, began to create their own elected bodies. The European government did not care for this idea, and took extra measures to see to it that local elected self-government did not achieve autonomy, even with respect to matters that did not directly affect the larger European Empire people.

5. Oppression of Political Protesters
As colonial protest against British government became more common, British colonial law enforcement authorities took measures to crack down on dissent. Among the more infamous examples of this were the 1769 imprisonment of Alexander McDougall (on “libel” charges) for his work To the Betrayed Inhabitants of the City and Colony of New York, and the 1770 Boston Massacre in which British troops fired on a crowd of colonial protesters, killing five.

5. Oppression of Political Protesters
As African protest against European government became more common, European law enforcement authorities took measures to crack down on dissent. Among the more infamous examples of this were the 1977 imprisonment of Assata Shakur (on trumped up charges) for her work in the Black Panther Party and the Black Liberation Army, and the 1956 to 1971 (and unofficially beyond) COINTELPRO Massacre in which FBI agents engaged in active warfare against African protesters, killing an innumerable amount.

6. Immunity for Corrupt and Abusive British Officers
The Boston Massacre trial was an interesting spectacle. Eight British soldiers were accused, but defended by the future president John Adams, who won acquittal for six of the eight and the equivalent to a dishonorable discharge for the other two. Still, British leaders were concerned enough to pass a law mandating that any British officers accused of an offense be tried in England (where witnesses would be hard to find) rather than in the colonies.

6. Immunity for Corrupt and Abusive European Officers
The COINTELPRO Massacre trial was an interesting spectacle–it never happened. In the case of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, a sacrificial lamb took the place of exposing the systemic oppression of African people. Still, to this day, the Government officially states innocence in his and many other assassinations and acts of oppression. No remuneration, no apology, no truth.

7. Direct Control of the Criminal Justice System
Over a period of decades, as distrust of colonial authorities grew, the British government began to deny jury trials and place both verdicts and punishments in the hands of judges. As time wore on, the British government also took measures to ensure that those judges would be selected, paid, and supervised by British rather than colonial authorities.

7. Direct Control of the Criminal Justice System
Over a period of centuries, as distrust of European authorities grew, the European government began to deny jury trials and place both verdicts and punishments in the hands of judges. As time wore on, the European government also took measures to ensure that those judges would be selected, paid, and supervised by Europeans rather than African authorities. It’s at a point where 1 in 9 African children have an incarcerated parent (compared to 1 in 57 European children.)

8. Guilty by Parliament
Centralized British control of the criminal justice system, with no possibility of trial by jury, may seem to suggest that colonists were at the mercy of British officers–but the truth is that they always had been. By sheer fiat (through resolutions called Bills of Attainder), Parliament could declare any person to be “tainted,” imprisoning or even executing the subject and confiscating all of his/her property without trial.

8. Guilty by Congress
Centralized European control of the criminal justice system, with no possibility of trial by jury, may seem to suggest that Africans were at the mercy of European officers–but the truth is that they always had been. By sheer fiat (through resolutions called Bills of Attainder), Congress could declare any person to be “tainted,” imprisoning or even executing the subject and confiscating all of his/her property without trial.

9. Forced Quartering of Soldiers
From the beginning, colonies were held responsible for hosting facilities to house British soldiers. But as colonial dissent began to grow, the British government mandated a new and far more distressing requirement: Individual colonists would be required to let British soldiers live in their private homes. In the wake of the Boston Massacre, and given the particular sense of conflict in the pre-Revolutionary years, this was as traumatic as it was inconvenient.

9. Forced Quartering of Soldiers Officers Individuals
From the beginning, Africans were held responsible for hosting facilities to house European soldiers officers. But as African dissent began to grow, the European government mandated a new and far more distressing requirement: Individual Africans would be required to let regular Europeans live in their private homes (gentrification). In the wake of the COINTELPRO Massacre, and given the particular sense of conflict in the pre-Revolutionary years, this was as traumatic as it was inconvenient.

10. Closure of the Boston Port
Colonial and British tensions came to a head when sixty colonists, dressed up as American Indians, protested high tariffs and the British monopoly on imported goods by dumping 342 crates of tea delivered by the British East India Company into the Atlantic Ocean. The event, referred to as the Boston Tea Party, provoked Parliament to pass a law closing the Boston port until the colonies managed to gather up enough money to pay for the tea. To this day, the tea debt has not been paid.

10. Bombing of the Greenwood District
African and European tensions came to a head when ten-thousand Africans, dressed up in dignity and race pride, protested high tariffs and the European monopoly on imported goods by creating a Prosperous, Independent African Community in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The development, referred to as the “Negro’s Wall Street”, provoked Europeans to invade the African district closing the Tulsa community until the Africans managed to gather up enough money to rebuild. Immediately, following the attack, 10,000 were left homeless, thousands were killed, 600 successful businesses were ruined and pass cards like South Africa’s were put into effect. It was the first U.S. city bombed from the air. To this day, the atrocity is censored.

More:

Also research: Rosewood, Florida, and East St Louis, Illinois

Read other Grievances.  The Solution is Separation.  Join the African Blood Siblings.

7 thoughts on “Top 10 Civil Liberties Violations that Helped Cause the African Revolution in America

  1. omalone1

    G Wiz. I must say this looks like one of the more elaborate posts of yours. Just looing over it, it seems much thought has gone into it. at first I was sceptical of the phrase “civil liberties” and yet, having rushed through the piece, I apprecaite the conrast

    Reply
    1. Onitaset Post author

      Honestly, this was more of a filler; the comparisons made themselves. But I appreciate the compliments. This is really a set-up for Frederick Douglass’ oration. Take your time with this one. It’s satirical. I know you enjoy satire. :)

      Reply
    1. Onitaset Post author

      It’s right and wrong. The 18th century reference is to an actual “American Revolution.” The 21st century reference is to a mythical “African Revolution in America.” Unless you mean spelling in which case, yes, 21th is incorrect and 21st is correct. I let the parallelism mislead me.

      Thanks.

      Reply
  2. sittinducks

    There is something eerily similar to Whites looting of “Little Africa” in 1921 and the “looting” of the Black community under the guise of the “war on drugs”. The big difference is the appearance of legality today. It goes something like this:

    1. The Black community is flooded with drugs via Black gangs, who are often Black youth.
    2. The Black gangs recruit members and begin their devastation upon the community; both in
    terms of violence due to gang rivalry and spreading the poison.
    3. The local police allow this to go on for a while. In the meantime the youth have accumulated
    an abundance of material possessions and cash.
    4. The local police resembling an army invading enemy territory, swoops down in the early
    morning hours arresting everyone in the house, and confiscating the home, cars,
    jewelry, cash, etc. The drug dealers are often funneled into the prison industrial complex for
    slave labor.
    5. The police then split the “spoils” among themselves and the story goes on and on.

    According to studies this is only done in the Black community even though Whites use and distribute more drugs. And distribution of the drugs don’t seem to occur via youthful gangs which devastate the White community.

    So it would appear that it is not the use of drugs that the system cares about, but the destruction of the Black communities across Amerikkka, and the “spoils” it brings with it.
    It doesn’t take much reasoning to figure out if they cared about drug use, the entry of the drugs into the community would be the focus, and not the “little” drug dealers/gang members.

    This is what happens when there is no vigilante,tightly organized Black community. It is anyone’s for the taking. The real tragedy is our children have been taken and fed to the prison industrial complex as slaves, furthering the devastation of families and communities.

    Reply
    1. Onitaset Post author

      By the time the fool has learned the game, the players have dispersed

      We can only speak to those who will listen and demand that they are enlisted into a project for our Liberation. All we can do is struggle by building projects with as many as we can recruit. “If there is no struggle there is no progress.” That’s it.

      We can not stop the European’s hatred of us nor his will to kill and that’s fine. All we can do is stop his Power to Kill us and that will only come through struggle–getting our siblings to listen and enlist.

      (I never noticed before that “enlist” and “listen” have the same letters.)

      Reply

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