Dr. Amos Wilson’s Last Interview (1995)

Listen Siblings, I come in peace,

“All of us may not live to see the higher accomplishments of an African empire, so strong and powerful as to compel the respect of mankind, but we in our lifetime can so work and act as to make the dream a possibility within another generation.” — Marcus Garvey

Dr. Amos Wilson died in 1995 under mysterious circumstances.  Few understand how he died; yet the method appears similar to Dr. Khalid Muhammad’s death.  Both were warriors for the African race.  Dr. Amos Wilson asked:

“Why does the Black man say, “freedom is doing what I  want to do!” and why is it that every thing he “wants to do” enriches the European?”

In light of Marcus Garvey’s quotation (1920s), in light of Carter G. Woodson’s statements (1930s), but also in light of Ibn Battuta statement on our excellence (1300s) our work will reward us.

The African Blood Siblings has pointed out the North Star.  It’s time to point it out to others.  This is how so many of our ancestors liberated our ancestors.  This is how we will liberate ourselves.  Inspire other ABS readers in everyone (thank them for subscribing), collect other ABS leaders from your age-grade (your community will become Prosperous, Independent and African).  While resting, read the excerpt below.

It’s Dr. Amos Wilson’s last interview.  In addition, I added many hyperlinks; so if you read something that he said as interesting, I added more information from the ABS site.

They killed this ancestor but his ideas live on in you and communities.  He was writing “Blueprint for Black Power” (order from an African-owned store here) and they killed him but the ideas live on and Black Power is ours.  Continue your work on the African Blood Siblings Community Centers (write to help more) and distribute our flyer; our restored Communities will internationally connect.  We are the redeemers of Africa.

Subscribe, share, love, Ase

DR. AMOS WILSON’S LAST INTERVIEW 1995

{Excerpt from Dr. Amos N. Wilson’s Last Interview done by Muzunga Nia of RAW (Real Afrikan World, in January 1995 in his hometown of Hattiesburg, Mississippi.}

RAW: Now you have raised the possibility of genocide before in books such as Black-on-Black Violence. Could you briefly talk about how Black-on-Black crime serves white supremacy by playing a role in our own genocide?

WILSON: Well, what we are experiencing in the African American community is not just confined to America. You’ll find this experience in the Caribbean, in Africa, wherever you have large populations of Black people. You go to Brazil Black children are being shot in the streets; people just get in their cars and shoot Black children. You will find this sort of thing going on in Uruguay. A lot of us don’t realize that there are large populations of Black People in Central America and South America. Africa is suffering tremendously. You can even look the millions of Blacks in Europe. We are finding that there is a general oppression of Black people across the globe as the global economic system reorganizes itself, and reorganizes itself in a way to leave Blacks out of the global economic system, just as they are being left out of domestic economic systems. What you’re getting here when it comes back to Black-on-Black violence are reactions to the dynamic economic changes.

You’ve got a lot of people who want to lay all of this on family values and the absence of old time religion and things of this nature. And while that’s a part of the mix, you cannot just blame this all on the loss of family values. People don’t eat values, you know. You have to actually work; you have to feed your family. There are concrete material things that people have to have. The mere training of people in family values is not going to solve this problem. As a matter of fact, when you transform people’s material position in the world, you transform their values. So a part of transformation of the values that we complain about is a result of the transformation of the concrete living conditions of Black people.

The key to understanding the relationship that Black-on-Black crime has to white supremacy and genocide is knowing the context in which the problem occurs. Too often people want to talk about the problems that exist in the Black community as if they are unconnected to everything else going on in the country. This is a terrible mistake in analysis. You have to begin with the political and economic context in which a people exist in order to begin to understand their behavior. When Blacks commit violence against other Blacks, they’re committing it within a certain political economic context. Violent acts are social acts. We may call them anti-social, but they are still social, whether anti- or pro-, which means that they have to do with the nature of relationships between people. That’s what we mean when we use the word social. If we are to understand the social relationship of Blacks to whites and to the social and political system in which we exist When we look at this system under which we exist as Black people, we’ll see a connection between it and the kind of behavior the Black community is undergoing at this particular time.

RAW: So you’re saying that the rising tide of Black-on-Black crime is a direct result of the position of powerlessness that we currently occupy vis-a-vis the restructuring global economy?

WILSON: Yes, to a very great extent. We don’t think of crime as serving a social function. Some people’s negative behavior serves the interest of other people. For instance, Black children dropping out of school serves the interests of other people’s children, who then don’t have Black people to compete against. Our dropping out becomes a service to those who then can enter the positions for which we are no longer in competition…. As a matter of fact, during the first reconstruction, Blacks were robbed of the 40 acres and a mule promised them by the U.S. government as part of the REPARATIONS for slavery. A lot of people think that’s just a myth; but that was an actual act of Congress. This would have given Blacks an economic leg up, an economic independence which would have served as a platform for our political independence as well…. the white planter recognized that if you gave Black people this kind of land, they would not be able to use them in the cotton fields; they wouldn’t be able to profit from their destitution. It’s important to understand how you actually create poverty in a people so that you can use their services. You strip them of everything; therefore, they become utterly dependent upon you, and you use their dependency as a means of creating your own wealth and power.

Black people aren’t poor by accident. This serves the interest of somebody. The energy that we put into hurting each other is the energy that we can’t use to compete against other people. The stereotypes of Black-on-Black crime serve as a justification for other people to take advantage of us. But in a deeper sense, it serves to hide the criminality of whites. It makes us think that whites in America are not criminals and have not created a criminal.

RAW: Now is it not true that numerically and statistically, whites commit more violent crimes than Blacks?

WILSON: Definitely, just as there are more whites on welfare. Because of the media, you are lead to believe that Blacks are the only ones on welfare. But whites get far far more money out of the U.S. government. Most of the money distributed by the U.S. government is paid to middle class white folks and upper-class white folks while we are made to believe that it is the poor Blacks and the people on welfare that are getting the bulk of the money from the federal government. You see, a service is performed there. While the white upper class robs the nation of its wealth, and even robs the white middle class, the elites point to Blacks as the ones who are bankrupting America.

This is why you get image after image of Blacks on welfare, Blacks on crime. Those images serve the interest of those who are taking advantage of the system and want to hide how and what they are doing to the system. Our so-called criminality, our so-called being on welfare serves a useful political and economic purpose in the society.”

RAW: In your book, The Falsification of African Consciousness, you write about the critical role that history plays in developing the consciousness of a people. Could you elaborate on how knowledge of our true history can help us to overcome the myriad of problems facing us?

WILSON: Those who do not study history will repeat it. We’re talking about the first and second Reconstruction repeating itself. What I find interesting is the attitude that we in America have toward history, the belief that history is mere recapitulation of dates and times. Some people actually believe that history is unimportant in academic life or the life of a people. But one of the things that brings the importance of history to mind very quickly is when you try to teach Black History in schools, watch the objection you et to teaching Black history and culture. If history were so unimportant and meaningless, why is it that we have such strong opposition to the teaching of African history and culture? Why is it that the powers that be define how history is taught and what history will be taught? It’s because they know intrinsically that history defines who we are. We are history. We cannot live in the future – the future is always in front of us. And the present is essentially the leading edge of the past. You don’t leave your past behind. The past lives in your brain; in your behavior; the way you see life and the way you see yourself. Everything that happens to you in the present is filtered through past experiences present in your mind. This means the past is operationally present at every moment If that past is distorted, if your perception of it is incorrect, if it’s absent. Then when you look at things in the present, your perception will be distorted. You will not be able to effectively use what your see right in front of your face. You will not be able to take advantage of possibilities that you have nor will you be able to design your own future, because your history has been distorted. Whites have stolen and distorted the history of Blacks so that they can influence the type of behavior we exhibit. They have been able to shape our behavior to support their domination of us as a people. Thus, we continue to serve their interest.

RAW: Even when some of us find ourselves in a position of power such as Mayor, Governor, or President….

WILSON: Oh yes, definitely. You must recognize that consciousness is power; being aware, knowing something, and being able to do something is what consciousness is all about. This grants power. Remember, we act in terms of what we know, what we believe, what we expect, what we value, what skills we have. All of this is part of consciousness. Therefore, when you manipulate these things, you manipulate people’s ability.

History teaches us methods of coping. We learn from experience. Why do we teach our children things? We don’t want them to make the same mistakes we did. In teaching history, we transfer from one generation to the next methods of solving problems. When we don’t pass history on, you don’t pass on problem solving methods and techniques to the next generation. That generation, without a sense of history, is unable to solve problems, because it has not received methods to do so. It’s important to understand that the history we’ve been taught is not a history that brings with it problem-solving skills and other things needed to solve the problems that we face as African people.

A Source with more Amos Wilson threads: http://www.abibitumikasa.com/forums/afrikan-educational-systems/38411-amos-wilson-last-interview-1995-a.html

29 thoughts on “Dr. Amos Wilson’s Last Interview (1995)

  1. omalone1

    May you one day do a post dedicated to mysterious deaths. Walter Rodney might truly head that list. By the way, you seem to get many hits as I really come to your blog after I follow key word links.

    Reply
    1. Onitaset Post author

      “How long shall they kill our prophets, while we stand aside and look.” — Bob Marley

      Brother, our consciousness needs to be corrected. Though that’s my greatest endeavor, at the moment, the African Blood Siblings is largely unknown and more largely under-appreciated.

      “Love is one thing, knowledge is another.” — KMT Proverb

      http://africanbloodsiblings.wordpress.com/2012/02/04/kmt-self-knowledge-and-cosmic-wisdom-quotations/

      We need to reach our people to restore our condition. Please continue to share.

      Reply
    1. Onitaset Post author

      The seed includes all the possibilities of the tree.

      The seed will develop these possibilities, however, only if it receives corresponding energies from the sky. — KMT Proverb

      All of us are warriors. Amos Wilson answered his calling. It’s our duty to not only, at the opportune time, answer our own, but so too to shine the corresponding energies onto the potential of our siblings.

      You do so. But when you feel you are not committing hard enough, commit harder. Let our lifetime be where Prosperous, Independent African Communities are commonplace, where ours understand the problem with the Europeans and Asians is Europeans and Asians, and where neither of us need to be helpless against the injustices on our people.

      I petition you to help build an African Blood Siblings Community Center. Loving, Knowledgeable and Wise Africans can be cultivated in your Community and life will be ‘life,’ like our ancestors knew it.

      Thanks for sharing,

      Reply
      1. Kushite Prince

        Yeah I hear you. We have to get in touch with our warrior spirit. Too many of us are just getting by day to day. I don’t know to many black folks that want to fight against our oppression. A lot of them actually believe now that Obama is President,we’re nearing a post-racial America. Nothing could be further from the truth.

      2. Onitaset Post author

        If we rely on where our people are, we will remain where we are. You must speak our language on the streets and form a Brotherhood to rally for our cause.

        In my ‘street’ research, I have seen that not only is the language of a “Community Center” welcomed, but the prospect is sufficient to addressing our problem.

        Don’t worry of where our people are. Speak to them of this higher purpose until you have twenty men in your age grade. From them you can accomplish the transformation of your community.

        See: http://africanbloodsiblings.wordpress.com/african-blood-siblings-community-centers/

  2. Kushite Prince

    I agree with what you’re saying. It can be an uphill battle. It seems when I try to explain to black people about what the government is doing to our food,cops killing us in the streets and homosexual agenda—they don’t want to hear it. They don’t want to hear anything that can change their situation. They’re too preoccupied with tennis shoes,hairstyles,reality shows and sports. None of those things will change our position. It’s like they like being ignorant. I’ve even gotten into heated debates with family members. It can get hard but I don’t lose hope. I do love my people but they frustrate me a lot.
    I got to a study group on Thursday nights. We study about African history and we pick a book of the month. We’re in the process of doing something in the community. We’re all conscious and know what’s being done to our community. But we need to branch out more and get the message out. But I haven’t lost focus. Our situation can get depressing at times but I push on.

    Reply
    1. Onitaset Post author

      Brother Kushite,

      It’s rarely the listener, but the speaker, who errors. When you do not reach a person, learn from what you did and change the approach accordingly.

      I speak on the streets. Certain Sisters walk away and certain Brothers laugh, but I gathered phone numbers and email addresses from people by only proposing a transformed community and I’m only getting better and better at the skill.

      Do not forget that Garvey did it, that Malcolm did it, that Booker did it, that I did it and you can do it.

      It has been my realization that our people ‘tell’ rather than ‘sell.’ We need to ‘sell’ African Liberation, and very importantly, we need to communicate action, not simply ideas. Because, the food being lacking is one thing, but what about it? Tell me what I can do to make the food healthy and show me that you are whom I should listen to. From there you have a follower.

      You can email me a street approach of yours at AfricanBloodSibs@aim.com. I can analyze it for you.

      I recommend this quiz: http://africanbloodsiblings.wordpress.com/2012/02/02/social-quiz-who-are-you/

      Reply
  3. Kushite Prince

    Yes I believe you’re right. It’s all about the approach. You don’t want to scare someone away by coming on too strong. I see your point. Thanks for the email. I’ll get at you. I need to check out that quiz. That looks very interesting. I’ll have to send it to some people I know.
    The study group I attend is a local bookstore. Here’s the website.
    http://www.shadesofafrika.com/

    Reply
    1. Onitaset Post author

      Brother Kushite, I come in peace,

      The bookstore seems beautiful. If it is local to you, you can use it to your advantage. After you do the quiz and email me your approach, I can give you some advice for engaging with passersby. Just target your age grade* and with twenty members, you all can weekly gather to get some African Blood Siblings Community Center (ABSCC) going. Perhaps, if you use the Bookstore, you won’t have the name “ABSCC” right away, but to gather and study, not books, but science, “Philosophy, Sociology, Ecology and Psychology,” you can provide a space to transform the consciousness of your area. That transformed consciousness will be what changes the Community. To have a look at what these sciences mean, study these two posts:

      http://africanbloodsiblings.wordpress.com/2012/06/29/the-philosophical-basis-of-african-liberation-and-the-means-to-achieve-it/

      http://africanbloodsiblings.wordpress.com/2012/07/01/the-philosophical-basis-of-racial-separation-and-the-means-to-achieve-it/

      * http://africanbloodsiblings.wordpress.com/2012/06/14/excerpt-on-age-grades-in-africa-and-the-african-blood-siblings/

      Reply
  4. omalone1

    let the circle remain open .
    I recently sat through Hidden Colours 2 and was left feeling that one two hour Amos Wilson lecture would have been better than the entire viewing.

    Reply
    1. Onitaset Post author

      We must hold certain tenets. One of the ABS’ core tenets reads: “The Problem with Europeans and Asians is Europeans and Asians; the Solution for Africans is Africans.” The latter part covers Garvey’s admonition “We must not mistake lip-service and noise for bravery and service.” It’s the service of African people which will Liberate African people. For what it’s worth Hidden Colours 2 is the service those auditors can provide. It’s service however, judging from Hidden Colours 1, wasn’t suited for you, but the less conscious among us. However if that’s the case, then your service is apparent. For another tenet is “Opposing wrong makes a right.” If anything was “wrong” in Hidden Colors 2, make an opposition your service. And do it with Liberation and Organization in mind (other Core Tenets.)

      You want to empower you and yours through an Organized Service. The time is now and that’s the opportunity that the African Blood Siblings provides.

      The flyers are now ready to be distributed. When you can, hand some out. But also, though it might be outdated, you can take a look at the social quiz again:

      http://africanbloodsiblings.wordpress.com/2012/02/02/social-quiz-who-are-you/

      My younger Brother, Organize a Service that can Sustain you. Gather Brothers in your age-grade who can address a local need and hold them to the core tenets. Then your independence comes and our race’s comes closer.

      Hotep!

      Reply
    1. Onitaset Post author

      I haven’t yet came across information that suggests he did. For instance, the most opportune time to acknowledge “Wife and Kids” is in the Dedication of a Book. In “Blueprint for Black Power” ( http://shop.blackbookplus.com/Blueprint-for-Black-Power-187916406X.htm ), the dedication is unspecific. “Black on Black Violence . . .” and “Developmental Psychology of the Black Child” suggest a Family. The most robust description of that Family is found in “Awakening the Natural Genius of Black Children.” There he lists his Mother and Father, his four Sisters and three Brothers. He doesn’t mention either a Wife or any Children.

      He may have had Children. But those listed in his Acknowledgements would be the better people to ask. I uphold Dr. Amos Wilson for his promotion of African Empowerment and hence African Nationalism. On African Nationalism the following Posting can illuminate:

      http://africanbloodsiblings.wordpress.com/2013/02/18/of-understanding-and-benefiting-from-african-nationalism/

      May you find what you seek,
      and return to assist in our development,

      Reply
      1. FMC1

        He made a dedication to his Raaheem (referred to as his son) in Black Adolescence Male Violence.

    2. FMC1

      I think he may have had a son named Raaheem. I saw a dedication to him in his book, “Understanding Black Adolescent Male Violence: It’s Remediation and Prevention.”

      Reply
    1. Onitaset Post author

      This is how White Power operates. Amos Wilson left us with the Blueprint for Black Power. It’s only upon us to Organize Black Power now.

      Reply
  5. Jones Lin

    Yesterday, I discovered many truths from ancient history, which I paused to ingest, and digest the explosion of my traditional teaching of lies, deception, and deceit. Respectfully, I asked the Heavenly Father, the Creator of all things to guide my learning, understanding, research, investigation, and examination of true factual knowledge. Furthermore, I called upon my ancient indigenous ancestors to help. Today, I pause to mentally and spiritually transition the capacity of learning ancient truths with dignity, and the spirit of replenishing my delayed promised lifestyle. Undeniably, I had to separate from agents, puppets, and undercover spies to read quality expensive books without negative distractions. It feels like a rebirth of knowledge from the origin, not from tainted, corrupt, and distorted errors. Retrospectively, and introspectively I now understand the purpose of negative psychological distractions. Finally, I went beyond the Biblical canon, beyond my higher learning, in psychology, and beyond the pulpits for this knowledge. The truth of history is true mental wealth, empowerment, discipline, and balance. Financial stability is mentally essential for reaching and empowering others. Homeschooling is a must! A strong family head, support, and foundations is the prize. Raise your children with mental, physical, and spiritual concrete history, substance, wisdom, and purpose.

    Reply
  6. Marie Abanga

    I just came across this blog when I searched for powerful black motivational speakers on you tube and came across Dr. Amos Wilson. I sought to know more on him and I googled and clicked on your post. It is a great one. One so touching.

    I am not an African American, just an African but as he rightly said, the black’s problem is so much similar wherever even back in Africa.

    Hmm, I am in Belgium for a year now and experience more of what he says.

    As a woman, hmm, the struggle is even more complicated but struggle we must.

    Courage therefore for your work though maybe just drops in the ocean!

    Reply

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